I do not think it means what you think it means.

Sweet 'n' sour
emo lol
germankitty
If someone is in danger of becoming a character's "little marinate", they're in a fine pickle.

Took me a minute to figure out they meant "marionette". *snicker*

(no subject)
skifflesun
san_valentine
I found these two gems in YouTube comments in the last week.

"It happened tune and tune again."

"..left by the waste side."


That second one is so near and yet so far...

Sometimes language hurts.
Glitch
kshandra
Quoted with permission, from my friend clawfoot:

I was reading a book. A normal book. Nothing unusual.

Then BAM.

"His body fell, like a mannequin with its strings cut."

...

...

...

MANNEQUIN.

WITH.

STRINGS??

?!??



MARIONETTE. THE WORD YOU'RE LOOKING FOR IS MARIONETTE, MOTHERFUCKER.

THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH YOU

AND YOUR EDITOR

(no subject)
Fiddle
oakmouse
From The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy, chapter 11:

"He stood somewhat insulated: the envoy of the Revolutionary Government of France was not likely to be very popular in England, at a time when the news of the awful September massacres, and of the Reign of Terror and Anarchy, had just begun to filtrate across the Channel."

(Well, no, it had begun to filter across the Channel. The filtrate is what gets caught in the filter, like the bits of food that get caught in the basket in your sink drain the liquid that comes through the filter, in modern usage.)


ETA: see correction from lilacsigil. I got this from someone with a background in science history, and trusted them to have checked their facts (and to have given me a correct definition of "filtrate"). Apparently they hadn't, however. Sorry! Next time I'll check it myself before posting.

he leaked it
черная овца
marsianka_selma
So if you care - share and share and share until everyone will know Sasha the corrupt cup.

Not quite a capital mistake, but ...
txt google
germankitty
This is more a typo than a wrong word, but probably an easy thing to get wrong if you blindly trust spellcheck.

"This august performance/body/whatever" means that something is majestic, eminent, inspiring reverence or admiration (to quote Dictionary.com). Here, "august" is an adjective or descriptor, and thus NOT capitalized.

Capitalized, August either is a name or commonly refers to the eighth month of the year. So "this August performance" would either mean a performance BY some guy named August, or it takes place IN August. It doesn't say anything about the quality of said performance.

Please not to confuse them, kthnxbai.

A colourful relationship...
StarryDiadem1
starry_diadem
From a Jane Austin fanfic:

"Miss Riley, it is no concern to you who I am aquatinted with or who I wish to marry...."

Irregular verbs. Learn them.
txt wrongworddammit
germankitty
Because if you don't, you could (*Gasps!Shock!!Horror!!!*) change their meaning.

For example, when you've lost or misplaced something, or have come across it by accident yesterday, or last year, or at whatever point in time already gone by, it's quite correct to say that you found something ... because it has already happened; it's in the past .

However, if you're coming across that same something unexpectedly, or are in the process of discovering the item, you find it ... because it's happening right now; it's in the present.

Now, founding something means that you are creating or establishing something new. Having done so in the past means you founded it.

Ergo, Harry Potter can find the Room of Requirement (or has found it last week), but didn't found it today. (Note, too, the different auxiliary verbs.) The words may look identical at first glance and therefore seem interchangeable, but (*more Gasps!Shock!!Horror!!!*) they're not.

That is all.

Apologies for the html abuse.

Sounds like a lot of bull...
antenna girl
kengr
Just saw someone refer to a "bull item" board...

(no subject)
Apple
chelonianmobile
The expression referring to a very short distance is a "hair's breadth". A "hair's length" could mean anything up to eighteen and a half feet.

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